As I researched recent developments in the telematics space, I thought of the wise words of an unknown car driver: “The worst fault of a car driver is his belief that he has none.” Whenever I speak to a group on telematics, I ask the audience, “Who considers themselves to be a better than average driver?” Every time, at least 80-to-90 percent of the hands go up. Most of us are guilty of that insightful driver’s allegation. But, even if we are all close to perfect drivers, accidents still will happen. And telematics data can be used to help identify who is at fault.

Claims handling might be the new frontier for telematics in general; beyond the early adopters of telematics-based pricing, many insurers have run pilots and proofs of concept with telematics in areas such as product development, underwriting, new business, and market segmentation. They have gathered insights and developed telematics-based solutions for the broader market, often with the support of increasingly sophisticated telematics solution providers in technology or data and analytics. In fact, the SMA 2015 report, “The Changing Auto Insurance Landscape: Influencers Driving Disruption and Change,” revealed that since its introduction to the market in 2010, telematics has come to be recognized as a maturing rather than emerging technology and often gets incorporated into connected car initiatives. The study also discussed how the industry is starting to investigate even newer technologies that might affect the auto insurance market, such as shared transportation and the autonomous vehicle.

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