Hmmm . . . That combination is pretty tasty in a Waldorf salad, but it’s a bit hard to think of other recipes that do appeal.

The Apple Watch is very attractive—one analyst hoped it would be stylish enough to wear to the Oscars. (I’ll let everyone know what I decide to do next year).

But from a health care, health insurance and Internet-of-things perspective, questions still remain. Early information is that the Apple Watch’s biomonitoring functions are pretty modest: pulse and movement (and distance?). Did anyone say fitness band?

See also: Success of Consumer-Based Apple iWatch Tied to Health Care Stakeholders

Somehow “killer app” doesn’t sound quite right in this context, but that is the real question in terms of making people with serious medical conditions (or serious medical vulnerabilities) want to buy the Apple Watch. In roughly ascending order of technical and ergonomic challenges—temperature, blood pressure, glucose levels, blood chemistry of all different types, urine analysis, and (why not?) genome-driven personalized medicine—are off in the future, in some cases well beyond the horizon for a wearable (time telling, messaging, location-revealing) device.

Meanwhile there is always next year’s Oscars.

btw: in case you were wondering about the Mayo . . . 

This blog has been reprinted with permission from Celent.

Donald Light is a senior analyst in Celent's insurance practice, and can be reached at dlight@celent.com.

Readers are encouraged to respond to Donald using the “Add Your Comments” box below.

The opinions posted in this blog do not necessarily reflect those of Insurance Networking News or SourceMedia.

 

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